Calcium, oxidative stress and connexin channels, a harmonious orchestra directing the response to radiotherapy treatment?

Research output: Contribution to journalLiterature reviewpeer-review

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Calcium, oxidative stress and connexin channels, a harmonious orchestra directing the response to radiotherapy treatment? / Decrock, Elke; Hoorelbeke, Delphine; Ramadan, Raghda; Delvaeye, Tinneke; De Bock, Marijke; Wang, Nan; Krysko, Dmitry V; Baatout, Sarah; Bultynck, Geert; Aerts, An; Vinken, Mathieu; Leybaert, Luc.

In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta , Vol. 1864, No. 6, 01.06.2017, p. 1099-1120.

Research output: Contribution to journalLiterature reviewpeer-review

Harvard

Decrock, E, Hoorelbeke, D, Ramadan, R, Delvaeye, T, De Bock, M, Wang, N, Krysko, DV, Baatout, S, Bultynck, G, Aerts, A, Vinken, M & Leybaert, L 2017, 'Calcium, oxidative stress and connexin channels, a harmonious orchestra directing the response to radiotherapy treatment?', Biochimica et Biophysica Acta , vol. 1864, no. 6, pp. 1099-1120. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbamcr.2017.02.007

APA

Decrock, E., Hoorelbeke, D., Ramadan, R., Delvaeye, T., De Bock, M., Wang, N., Krysko, D. V., Baatout, S., Bultynck, G., Aerts, A., Vinken, M., & Leybaert, L. (2017). Calcium, oxidative stress and connexin channels, a harmonious orchestra directing the response to radiotherapy treatment? Biochimica et Biophysica Acta , 1864(6), 1099-1120. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbamcr.2017.02.007

Vancouver

Decrock E, Hoorelbeke D, Ramadan R, Delvaeye T, De Bock M, Wang N et al. Calcium, oxidative stress and connexin channels, a harmonious orchestra directing the response to radiotherapy treatment? Biochimica et Biophysica Acta . 2017 Jun 1;1864(6):1099-1120. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbamcr.2017.02.007

Author

Decrock, Elke ; Hoorelbeke, Delphine ; Ramadan, Raghda ; Delvaeye, Tinneke ; De Bock, Marijke ; Wang, Nan ; Krysko, Dmitry V ; Baatout, Sarah ; Bultynck, Geert ; Aerts, An ; Vinken, Mathieu ; Leybaert, Luc. / Calcium, oxidative stress and connexin channels, a harmonious orchestra directing the response to radiotherapy treatment?. In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta . 2017 ; Vol. 1864, No. 6. pp. 1099-1120.

Bibtex - Download

@article{aa9decb83fd04308a5615dbf1fd9a7d2,
title = "Calcium, oxidative stress and connexin channels, a harmonious orchestra directing the response to radiotherapy treatment?",
abstract = "Although radiotherapy is commonly used to treat cancer, its beneficial outcome is frequently hampered by the radiation resistance of tumor cells and adverse reactions in normal tissues. Mechanisms of cell-to-cell communication and how intercellular signals are translated into cellular responses, have become topics of intense investigation, particularly within the field of radiobiology. A substantial amount of evidence is available demonstrating that both gap junctional and paracrine communication pathways can propagate radiation-induced biological effects at the intercellular level, commonly referred to as radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE). Multiple molecular signaling mechanisms involving oxidative stress, kinases, inflammatory molecules, and Ca2+ are postulated to contribute to RIBE. Ca2+ is a highly versatile and ubiquitous second messenger that regulates diverse cellular processes via the interaction with various signaling cascades. It furthermore provides a fast system for the dissemination of information at the intercellular level. Channels formed by transmembrane connexin (Cx) proteins, i.e. hemichannels and gap junction channels, can mediate the cell-to-cell propagation of increases in intracellular Ca2+ by ministering paracrine and direct cell-cell communication, respectively. We here review current knowledge on radiation-induced signaling mechanisms in irradiated and bystander cells, particularly focusing on the contribution of oxidative stress, Ca2+ and Cx channels. By illustrating the tight interplay between these different partners, we provide a conceptual framework for intercellular Ca2+ signaling as a key player in modulating the RIBE and the overall response to radiation. Copyright � 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "Ionizing radioation, Calcium, Oxidative stress, Connexin hemichannel, gap junction, Bystander effect",
author = "Elke Decrock and Delphine Hoorelbeke and Raghda Ramadan and Tinneke Delvaeye and {De Bock}, Marijke and Nan Wang and Krysko, {Dmitry V} and Sarah Baatout and Geert Bultynck and An Aerts and Mathieu Vinken and Luc Leybaert",
note = "Score=10",
year = "2017",
month = jun,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.bbamcr.2017.02.007",
language = "English",
volume = "1864",
pages = "1099--1120",
journal = "Biochimica et Biophysica Acta ",
issn = "0006-3002",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "6",

}

RIS - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Calcium, oxidative stress and connexin channels, a harmonious orchestra directing the response to radiotherapy treatment?

AU - Decrock, Elke

AU - Hoorelbeke, Delphine

AU - Ramadan, Raghda

AU - Delvaeye, Tinneke

AU - De Bock, Marijke

AU - Wang, Nan

AU - Krysko, Dmitry V

AU - Baatout, Sarah

AU - Bultynck, Geert

AU - Aerts, An

AU - Vinken, Mathieu

AU - Leybaert, Luc

N1 - Score=10

PY - 2017/6/1

Y1 - 2017/6/1

N2 - Although radiotherapy is commonly used to treat cancer, its beneficial outcome is frequently hampered by the radiation resistance of tumor cells and adverse reactions in normal tissues. Mechanisms of cell-to-cell communication and how intercellular signals are translated into cellular responses, have become topics of intense investigation, particularly within the field of radiobiology. A substantial amount of evidence is available demonstrating that both gap junctional and paracrine communication pathways can propagate radiation-induced biological effects at the intercellular level, commonly referred to as radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE). Multiple molecular signaling mechanisms involving oxidative stress, kinases, inflammatory molecules, and Ca2+ are postulated to contribute to RIBE. Ca2+ is a highly versatile and ubiquitous second messenger that regulates diverse cellular processes via the interaction with various signaling cascades. It furthermore provides a fast system for the dissemination of information at the intercellular level. Channels formed by transmembrane connexin (Cx) proteins, i.e. hemichannels and gap junction channels, can mediate the cell-to-cell propagation of increases in intracellular Ca2+ by ministering paracrine and direct cell-cell communication, respectively. We here review current knowledge on radiation-induced signaling mechanisms in irradiated and bystander cells, particularly focusing on the contribution of oxidative stress, Ca2+ and Cx channels. By illustrating the tight interplay between these different partners, we provide a conceptual framework for intercellular Ca2+ signaling as a key player in modulating the RIBE and the overall response to radiation. Copyright � 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

AB - Although radiotherapy is commonly used to treat cancer, its beneficial outcome is frequently hampered by the radiation resistance of tumor cells and adverse reactions in normal tissues. Mechanisms of cell-to-cell communication and how intercellular signals are translated into cellular responses, have become topics of intense investigation, particularly within the field of radiobiology. A substantial amount of evidence is available demonstrating that both gap junctional and paracrine communication pathways can propagate radiation-induced biological effects at the intercellular level, commonly referred to as radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE). Multiple molecular signaling mechanisms involving oxidative stress, kinases, inflammatory molecules, and Ca2+ are postulated to contribute to RIBE. Ca2+ is a highly versatile and ubiquitous second messenger that regulates diverse cellular processes via the interaction with various signaling cascades. It furthermore provides a fast system for the dissemination of information at the intercellular level. Channels formed by transmembrane connexin (Cx) proteins, i.e. hemichannels and gap junction channels, can mediate the cell-to-cell propagation of increases in intracellular Ca2+ by ministering paracrine and direct cell-cell communication, respectively. We here review current knowledge on radiation-induced signaling mechanisms in irradiated and bystander cells, particularly focusing on the contribution of oxidative stress, Ca2+ and Cx channels. By illustrating the tight interplay between these different partners, we provide a conceptual framework for intercellular Ca2+ signaling as a key player in modulating the RIBE and the overall response to radiation. Copyright � 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

KW - Ionizing radioation

KW - Calcium

KW - Oxidative stress

KW - Connexin hemichannel

KW - gap junction

KW - Bystander effect

UR - http://ecm.sckcen.be/OTCS/llisapi.dll/open/26103753

UR - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=decrock+baatout

U2 - 10.1016/j.bbamcr.2017.02.007

DO - 10.1016/j.bbamcr.2017.02.007

M3 - Literature review

VL - 1864

SP - 1099

EP - 1120

JO - Biochimica et Biophysica Acta

JF - Biochimica et Biophysica Acta

SN - 0006-3002

IS - 6

ER -

ID: 3029444