Human 3-D tissue models in radiation biology: current status and future perspectives

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Human 3-D tissue models in radiation biology: current status and future perspectives. / Acheva, A.; Aerts, An; Rombouts, Charlotte; Baatout, Sarah; Salomaa, S.; Manda, K.; Hildebrandt, G.; Kämäräinen, M.

In: International Journal of Radiation Research, Vol. 12, No. 2, 04.2014, p. 81-98.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Acheva, A, Aerts, A, Rombouts, C, Baatout, S, Salomaa, S, Manda, K, Hildebrandt, G & Kämäräinen, M 2014, 'Human 3-D tissue models in radiation biology: current status and future perspectives', International Journal of Radiation Research, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 81-98.

APA

Acheva, A., Aerts, A., Rombouts, C., Baatout, S., Salomaa, S., Manda, K., ... Kämäräinen, M. (2014). Human 3-D tissue models in radiation biology: current status and future perspectives. International Journal of Radiation Research, 12(2), 81-98.

Vancouver

Acheva A, Aerts A, Rombouts C, Baatout S, Salomaa S, Manda K et al. Human 3-D tissue models in radiation biology: current status and future perspectives. International Journal of Radiation Research. 2014 Apr;12(2):81-98.

Author

Acheva, A. ; Aerts, An ; Rombouts, Charlotte ; Baatout, Sarah ; Salomaa, S. ; Manda, K. ; Hildebrandt, G. ; Kämäräinen, M. / Human 3-D tissue models in radiation biology: current status and future perspectives. In: International Journal of Radiation Research. 2014 ; Vol. 12, No. 2. pp. 81-98.

Bibtex - Download

@article{5f7ce689961b49378307b95b18a8a7cb,
title = "Human 3-D tissue models in radiation biology: current status and future perspectives",
abstract = "In this review, we discuss the use of a variety of 3‐D models (particularly 3‐D skin, lung, breast and endothelial) in radiobiological research and highlight the differences in responses compared to 2‐D culturing conditions (monolayers). We review the characteristics of existing 3‐D models and aim to point out the substantial advantages 3‐D cultures provide for modern radiobiology. In particular, they may facilitate the shift from the classical DNA damage and repair studies mainly carried out in monolayer cultures to the investigation of more generalized responses through pathway analysis and a system biology approach. 3‐D models are expected to be very informative for investigations on radiotherapy responses in addressing the low dose risk. However, the 3‐D model systems are not as easy to propagate and standardize as monolayer cultures. Therefore, we discuss the problems and limitations of 3‐D models and propose ways to overcome some of the problems.",
keywords = "3-D tissue models, radiation biology",
author = "A. Acheva and An Aerts and Charlotte Rombouts and Sarah Baatout and S. Salomaa and K. Manda and G. Hildebrandt and M. K{\"a}m{\"a}r{\"a}inen",
note = "Score = 10",
year = "2014",
month = "4",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "81--98",
journal = "International Journal of Radiation Research",
issn = "2345-4229",
number = "2",

}

RIS - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Human 3-D tissue models in radiation biology: current status and future perspectives

AU - Acheva, A.

AU - Aerts, An

AU - Rombouts, Charlotte

AU - Baatout, Sarah

AU - Salomaa, S.

AU - Manda, K.

AU - Hildebrandt, G.

AU - Kämäräinen, M.

N1 - Score = 10

PY - 2014/4

Y1 - 2014/4

N2 - In this review, we discuss the use of a variety of 3‐D models (particularly 3‐D skin, lung, breast and endothelial) in radiobiological research and highlight the differences in responses compared to 2‐D culturing conditions (monolayers). We review the characteristics of existing 3‐D models and aim to point out the substantial advantages 3‐D cultures provide for modern radiobiology. In particular, they may facilitate the shift from the classical DNA damage and repair studies mainly carried out in monolayer cultures to the investigation of more generalized responses through pathway analysis and a system biology approach. 3‐D models are expected to be very informative for investigations on radiotherapy responses in addressing the low dose risk. However, the 3‐D model systems are not as easy to propagate and standardize as monolayer cultures. Therefore, we discuss the problems and limitations of 3‐D models and propose ways to overcome some of the problems.

AB - In this review, we discuss the use of a variety of 3‐D models (particularly 3‐D skin, lung, breast and endothelial) in radiobiological research and highlight the differences in responses compared to 2‐D culturing conditions (monolayers). We review the characteristics of existing 3‐D models and aim to point out the substantial advantages 3‐D cultures provide for modern radiobiology. In particular, they may facilitate the shift from the classical DNA damage and repair studies mainly carried out in monolayer cultures to the investigation of more generalized responses through pathway analysis and a system biology approach. 3‐D models are expected to be very informative for investigations on radiotherapy responses in addressing the low dose risk. However, the 3‐D model systems are not as easy to propagate and standardize as monolayer cultures. Therefore, we discuss the problems and limitations of 3‐D models and propose ways to overcome some of the problems.

KW - 3-D tissue models

KW - radiation biology

UR - http://ecm.sckcen.be/OTCS/llisapi.dll/open/ezp_135563

UR - http://knowledgecentre.sckcen.be/so2/bibref/11561

M3 - Article

VL - 12

SP - 81

EP - 98

JO - International Journal of Radiation Research

JF - International Journal of Radiation Research

SN - 2345-4229

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 120038