Lemna minor plants chronically exposed to ionising radiation:RNA-seq analysis indicates a dose rate dependent shift fromacclimation to survival strategies

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@article{537325c612f64781a9f6dbc80934241b,
title = "Lemna minor plants chronically exposed to ionising radiation:RNA-seq analysis indicates a dose rate dependent shift fromacclimation to survival strategies",
abstract = "Ecotoxicological research provides knowledge on ionising radiation-induced responses in different plantspecies. However, the sparse data currently available are mainly extracted from acute exposure treat-ments. To provide a better understanding of environmental exposure scenarios, the response to stressin plants must be followed in more natural relevant chronic conditions. We previously showed morpho-logical and biochemical responses in Lemna minor plants continuously exposed for 7 days in a dose-ratedependent manner. In this study responses on molecular (gene expression) and physiological (photosyn-thetic) level are evaluated in L. minor plants exposed to ionising radiation. To enable this, we examined thegene expression profiles of irradiated L. minor plants by using an RNA-seq approach. The gene expressiondata reveal indications that L. minor plants exposed at lower dose rates, can tolerate the exposure by trig-gering acclimation responses. In contrast, at the highest dose rate tested, a high number of genes relatedto antioxidative defense systems, DNA repair and cell cycle were differentially expressed suggesting thatonly high dose rates of ionising radiation drive L. minor plants into survival strategies. Notably, the pho-tosynthetic process seems to be unaffected in L. minor plants among the tested dose rates. This study,supported by our earlier work, clearly indicates that plants shift from acclimation responses towardssurvival responses at increasing dose rates of ionising radiation.�",
keywords = "duckweed, ionising radiation, radiation effects, oxidative stress, DNA damage",
author = "{Van Hoeck}, Arne and Nele Horemans and Robin Nauts and {Van Hees}, May and Hildegarde Vandenhove and Ronny Blust",
note = "Score=10",
year = "2017",
month = apr,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.plantsci.2017.01.010",
language = "English",
volume = "257",
pages = "84--95",
journal = "Plant Science",
issn = "0168-9452",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Lemna minor plants chronically exposed to ionising radiation:RNA-seq analysis indicates a dose rate dependent shift fromacclimation to survival strategies

AU - Van Hoeck, Arne

AU - Horemans, Nele

AU - Nauts, Robin

AU - Van Hees, May

AU - Vandenhove, Hildegarde

AU - Blust, Ronny

N1 - Score=10

PY - 2017/4/1

Y1 - 2017/4/1

N2 - Ecotoxicological research provides knowledge on ionising radiation-induced responses in different plantspecies. However, the sparse data currently available are mainly extracted from acute exposure treat-ments. To provide a better understanding of environmental exposure scenarios, the response to stressin plants must be followed in more natural relevant chronic conditions. We previously showed morpho-logical and biochemical responses in Lemna minor plants continuously exposed for 7 days in a dose-ratedependent manner. In this study responses on molecular (gene expression) and physiological (photosyn-thetic) level are evaluated in L. minor plants exposed to ionising radiation. To enable this, we examined thegene expression profiles of irradiated L. minor plants by using an RNA-seq approach. The gene expressiondata reveal indications that L. minor plants exposed at lower dose rates, can tolerate the exposure by trig-gering acclimation responses. In contrast, at the highest dose rate tested, a high number of genes relatedto antioxidative defense systems, DNA repair and cell cycle were differentially expressed suggesting thatonly high dose rates of ionising radiation drive L. minor plants into survival strategies. Notably, the pho-tosynthetic process seems to be unaffected in L. minor plants among the tested dose rates. This study,supported by our earlier work, clearly indicates that plants shift from acclimation responses towardssurvival responses at increasing dose rates of ionising radiation.�

AB - Ecotoxicological research provides knowledge on ionising radiation-induced responses in different plantspecies. However, the sparse data currently available are mainly extracted from acute exposure treat-ments. To provide a better understanding of environmental exposure scenarios, the response to stressin plants must be followed in more natural relevant chronic conditions. We previously showed morpho-logical and biochemical responses in Lemna minor plants continuously exposed for 7 days in a dose-ratedependent manner. In this study responses on molecular (gene expression) and physiological (photosyn-thetic) level are evaluated in L. minor plants exposed to ionising radiation. To enable this, we examined thegene expression profiles of irradiated L. minor plants by using an RNA-seq approach. The gene expressiondata reveal indications that L. minor plants exposed at lower dose rates, can tolerate the exposure by trig-gering acclimation responses. In contrast, at the highest dose rate tested, a high number of genes relatedto antioxidative defense systems, DNA repair and cell cycle were differentially expressed suggesting thatonly high dose rates of ionising radiation drive L. minor plants into survival strategies. Notably, the pho-tosynthetic process seems to be unaffected in L. minor plants among the tested dose rates. This study,supported by our earlier work, clearly indicates that plants shift from acclimation responses towardssurvival responses at increasing dose rates of ionising radiation.�

KW - duckweed

KW - ionising radiation

KW - radiation effects

KW - oxidative stress

KW - DNA damage

UR - http://ecm.sckcen.be/OTCS/llisapi.dll/open/27907622

U2 - 10.1016/j.plantsci.2017.01.010

DO - 10.1016/j.plantsci.2017.01.010

M3 - Article

VL - 257

SP - 84

EP - 95

JO - Plant Science

JF - Plant Science

SN - 0168-9452

ER -

ID: 3751020