Osmosis: the key process that drives water uptake and swelling of Eurobitum Bituminized Radioactive Waste

Research output: Contribution to report/book/conference proceedingsIn-proceedings paper

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Osmosis: the key process that drives water uptake and swelling of Eurobitum Bituminized Radioactive Waste. / Hendrix, Katrien; Bleyen, Nele; Smets, Steven; Verwimp, Wim; Sillen, Xavier; Valcke, Elie.

Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management XXXIX. Vol. 1/62 2016. ed. MRS - Materials Research Society, 2016. p. 4109-4155.

Research output: Contribution to report/book/conference proceedingsIn-proceedings paper

Harvard

Hendrix, K, Bleyen, N, Smets, S, Verwimp, W, Sillen, X & Valcke, E 2016, Osmosis: the key process that drives water uptake and swelling of Eurobitum Bituminized Radioactive Waste. in Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management XXXIX. 2016 edn, vol. 1/62, MRS - Materials Research Society, pp. 4109-4155, MRS 2015. The Scienfic Basis for Nuclear Waste mangement symposium, Montpellier, France, 2015-11-02. https://doi.org/10.1557/adv.2017.197

APA

Hendrix, K., Bleyen, N., Smets, S., Verwimp, W., Sillen, X., & Valcke, E. (2016). Osmosis: the key process that drives water uptake and swelling of Eurobitum Bituminized Radioactive Waste. In Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management XXXIX (2016 ed., Vol. 1/62, pp. 4109-4155). MRS - Materials Research Society. https://doi.org/10.1557/adv.2017.197

Vancouver

Hendrix K, Bleyen N, Smets S, Verwimp W, Sillen X, Valcke E. Osmosis: the key process that drives water uptake and swelling of Eurobitum Bituminized Radioactive Waste. In Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management XXXIX. 2016 ed. Vol. 1/62. MRS - Materials Research Society. 2016. p. 4109-4155 https://doi.org/10.1557/adv.2017.197

Author

Hendrix, Katrien ; Bleyen, Nele ; Smets, Steven ; Verwimp, Wim ; Sillen, Xavier ; Valcke, Elie. / Osmosis: the key process that drives water uptake and swelling of Eurobitum Bituminized Radioactive Waste. Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management XXXIX. Vol. 1/62 2016. ed. MRS - Materials Research Society, 2016. pp. 4109-4155

Bibtex - Download

@inproceedings{67be724261d9461893bcda1c125160a5,
title = "Osmosis: the key process that drives water uptake and swelling of Eurobitum Bituminized Radioactive Waste",
abstract = "In Belgium, the preferred long-term management option for Eurobitum bituminized ILW is its final disposal in a geologically stable clay formation such as the Boom Clay, which is studied as a reference host formation. After disposal, clay pore water will infiltrate the secondary concrete waste containers filled each with ten Eurobitum drums. Eurobitum contains hygroscopic salts, mostly NaNO3 (20-30 wt{\%}) and CaSO4 (4-6 wt{\%}), and thus will take up water and swell. If swelling is hindered, a pressure will be exerted on the concrete container and ultimately on the surrounding Boom Clay, possibly inducing stresses in the clay close to the disposal galleries. To improve our understanding of these processes, water uptake tests are ongoing in which inactive Eurobitum is contacted with 0.1 M KOH (representing young cement water). These tests suggest that the swelling is mainly driven by osmosis. This understanding was validated in the presented research by varying the water activity of the leachant in water uptake tests in both constant stress and constant volume conditions. After a stable swelling rate was reached in contact with 0.1 M KOH, the leachant was switched in the following order: nearly saturated (~7.8 M) NaNO3 – 0.1 M KOH – nearly saturated NaNO3 – 4 M NaNO3 – 0.1 M KOH. The changes in swelling rate and pressure evolution correlated nicely to the changes in water activity. This confirms that osmosis is the key process governing the swelling of Eurobitum.",
keywords = "stress/strain relationship, corrosion, waste management",
author = "Katrien Hendrix and Nele Bleyen and Steven Smets and Wim Verwimp and Xavier Sillen and Elie Valcke",
note = "Score=3",
year = "2016",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1557/adv.2017.197",
language = "English",
volume = "1/62",
pages = "4109--4155",
booktitle = "Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management XXXIX",
publisher = "MRS - Materials Research Society",
edition = "2016",

}

RIS - Download

TY - GEN

T1 - Osmosis: the key process that drives water uptake and swelling of Eurobitum Bituminized Radioactive Waste

AU - Hendrix, Katrien

AU - Bleyen, Nele

AU - Smets, Steven

AU - Verwimp, Wim

AU - Sillen, Xavier

AU - Valcke, Elie

N1 - Score=3

PY - 2016/12/1

Y1 - 2016/12/1

N2 - In Belgium, the preferred long-term management option for Eurobitum bituminized ILW is its final disposal in a geologically stable clay formation such as the Boom Clay, which is studied as a reference host formation. After disposal, clay pore water will infiltrate the secondary concrete waste containers filled each with ten Eurobitum drums. Eurobitum contains hygroscopic salts, mostly NaNO3 (20-30 wt%) and CaSO4 (4-6 wt%), and thus will take up water and swell. If swelling is hindered, a pressure will be exerted on the concrete container and ultimately on the surrounding Boom Clay, possibly inducing stresses in the clay close to the disposal galleries. To improve our understanding of these processes, water uptake tests are ongoing in which inactive Eurobitum is contacted with 0.1 M KOH (representing young cement water). These tests suggest that the swelling is mainly driven by osmosis. This understanding was validated in the presented research by varying the water activity of the leachant in water uptake tests in both constant stress and constant volume conditions. After a stable swelling rate was reached in contact with 0.1 M KOH, the leachant was switched in the following order: nearly saturated (~7.8 M) NaNO3 – 0.1 M KOH – nearly saturated NaNO3 – 4 M NaNO3 – 0.1 M KOH. The changes in swelling rate and pressure evolution correlated nicely to the changes in water activity. This confirms that osmosis is the key process governing the swelling of Eurobitum.

AB - In Belgium, the preferred long-term management option for Eurobitum bituminized ILW is its final disposal in a geologically stable clay formation such as the Boom Clay, which is studied as a reference host formation. After disposal, clay pore water will infiltrate the secondary concrete waste containers filled each with ten Eurobitum drums. Eurobitum contains hygroscopic salts, mostly NaNO3 (20-30 wt%) and CaSO4 (4-6 wt%), and thus will take up water and swell. If swelling is hindered, a pressure will be exerted on the concrete container and ultimately on the surrounding Boom Clay, possibly inducing stresses in the clay close to the disposal galleries. To improve our understanding of these processes, water uptake tests are ongoing in which inactive Eurobitum is contacted with 0.1 M KOH (representing young cement water). These tests suggest that the swelling is mainly driven by osmosis. This understanding was validated in the presented research by varying the water activity of the leachant in water uptake tests in both constant stress and constant volume conditions. After a stable swelling rate was reached in contact with 0.1 M KOH, the leachant was switched in the following order: nearly saturated (~7.8 M) NaNO3 – 0.1 M KOH – nearly saturated NaNO3 – 4 M NaNO3 – 0.1 M KOH. The changes in swelling rate and pressure evolution correlated nicely to the changes in water activity. This confirms that osmosis is the key process governing the swelling of Eurobitum.

KW - stress/strain relationship

KW - corrosion

KW - waste management

UR - http://ecm.sckcen.be/OTCS/llisapi.dll/open/23018603

U2 - 10.1557/adv.2017.197

DO - 10.1557/adv.2017.197

M3 - In-proceedings paper

VL - 1/62

SP - 4109

EP - 4155

BT - Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management XXXIX

PB - MRS - Materials Research Society

ER -

ID: 2352714