Public opinion change after the Fukushima nuclear accident: the role of national context revisited

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Public opinion change after the Fukushima nuclear accident : the role of national context revisited. / Latré, Edwin; Perko, Tanja; Thijssen, Peter.

In: Energy Policy, Vol. 104, 02.05.2017, p. 124-133.

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@article{a5b196e98a384570987abda7ce28f351,
title = "Public opinion change after the Fukushima nuclear accident: the role of national context revisited",
abstract = "This study explores how national context moderated change in support for nuclear energy after the Fukushima accident. The following national contextual variables are tested: geographical distance, nuclear energy production status, freedom of the press, and the building of new nuclear reactors. The results illustrate that previous research has misunderstood the moderating role of national context on opinion change after the Fukushima accident. A survey conducted shortly after the accident with more than 23,000 respondents from 41 countries has shown that geographical distance from the accident mattered: Contradicting a previous study, the decrease in support for nuclear energy was stronger in countries closer to Fukushima. In addition, support for nuclear energy decreased more in countries where new nuclear reactors were under construction. The country's nuclear energy production status and press freedom did not determine opinion change after the Fukushima accident. The non-effect of freedom of the press on opinion change contradicts the role of media after a focusing event as described in the literature. Overall results demonstrate a limited effect of national context on opinion change following a focusing event. Hence, national context provides only limited information to policy makers on how to respond to a nuclear accident.",
keywords = "Nuclear energy, opinion change, Fukushima, National ontext, distance, new build",
author = "Edwin Latr{\'e} and Tanja Perko and Peter Thijssen",
note = "Score=10",
year = "2017",
month = "5",
day = "2",
doi = "10.1016/j.enpol.2017.01.027",
language = "English",
volume = "104",
pages = "124--133",
journal = "Energy Policy",
issn = "0301-4215",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Public opinion change after the Fukushima nuclear accident

T2 - the role of national context revisited

AU - Latré, Edwin

AU - Perko, Tanja

AU - Thijssen, Peter

N1 - Score=10

PY - 2017/5/2

Y1 - 2017/5/2

N2 - This study explores how national context moderated change in support for nuclear energy after the Fukushima accident. The following national contextual variables are tested: geographical distance, nuclear energy production status, freedom of the press, and the building of new nuclear reactors. The results illustrate that previous research has misunderstood the moderating role of national context on opinion change after the Fukushima accident. A survey conducted shortly after the accident with more than 23,000 respondents from 41 countries has shown that geographical distance from the accident mattered: Contradicting a previous study, the decrease in support for nuclear energy was stronger in countries closer to Fukushima. In addition, support for nuclear energy decreased more in countries where new nuclear reactors were under construction. The country's nuclear energy production status and press freedom did not determine opinion change after the Fukushima accident. The non-effect of freedom of the press on opinion change contradicts the role of media after a focusing event as described in the literature. Overall results demonstrate a limited effect of national context on opinion change following a focusing event. Hence, national context provides only limited information to policy makers on how to respond to a nuclear accident.

AB - This study explores how national context moderated change in support for nuclear energy after the Fukushima accident. The following national contextual variables are tested: geographical distance, nuclear energy production status, freedom of the press, and the building of new nuclear reactors. The results illustrate that previous research has misunderstood the moderating role of national context on opinion change after the Fukushima accident. A survey conducted shortly after the accident with more than 23,000 respondents from 41 countries has shown that geographical distance from the accident mattered: Contradicting a previous study, the decrease in support for nuclear energy was stronger in countries closer to Fukushima. In addition, support for nuclear energy decreased more in countries where new nuclear reactors were under construction. The country's nuclear energy production status and press freedom did not determine opinion change after the Fukushima accident. The non-effect of freedom of the press on opinion change contradicts the role of media after a focusing event as described in the literature. Overall results demonstrate a limited effect of national context on opinion change following a focusing event. Hence, national context provides only limited information to policy makers on how to respond to a nuclear accident.

KW - Nuclear energy

KW - opinion change

KW - Fukushima

KW - National ontext

KW - distance

KW - new build

UR - http://ecm.sckcen.be/OTCS/llisapi.dll/open/25119187

U2 - 10.1016/j.enpol.2017.01.027

DO - 10.1016/j.enpol.2017.01.027

M3 - Article

VL - 104

SP - 124

EP - 133

JO - Energy Policy

JF - Energy Policy

SN - 0301-4215

ER -

ID: 2667389