Radiosensitivity and transgenerational effects in non-human species

Research output: Contribution to report/book/conference proceedingsIn-proceedings paper

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Radiosensitivity and transgenerational effects in non-human species. / Adam-Guillermin, Christelle; Hertal-Aas, T.; Oughton, Deborah; Blanchard, L.; Alonzo, Frédéric; Armant, Olivier; Horemans, Nele.

Annals of the ICRP: ICRP 2017 Proceedings. Vol. 47 3-4. ed. SAGE Publications, 2018. p. 327-341 (Annals of the ICRP).

Research output: Contribution to report/book/conference proceedingsIn-proceedings paper

Harvard

Adam-Guillermin, C, Hertal-Aas, T, Oughton, D, Blanchard, L, Alonzo, F, Armant, O & Horemans, N 2018, Radiosensitivity and transgenerational effects in non-human species. in Annals of the ICRP: ICRP 2017 Proceedings. 3-4 edn, vol. 47, Annals of the ICRP, SAGE Publications, pp. 327-341, 2017 - ICRP-ERPW, Paris, France, 2017-10-10. https://doi.org/10.1177/0146645318756844

APA

Adam-Guillermin, C., Hertal-Aas, T., Oughton, D., Blanchard, L., Alonzo, F., Armant, O., & Horemans, N. (2018). Radiosensitivity and transgenerational effects in non-human species. In Annals of the ICRP: ICRP 2017 Proceedings (3-4 ed., Vol. 47, pp. 327-341). (Annals of the ICRP). SAGE Publications. https://doi.org/10.1177/0146645318756844

Vancouver

Adam-Guillermin C, Hertal-Aas T, Oughton D, Blanchard L, Alonzo F, Armant O et al. Radiosensitivity and transgenerational effects in non-human species. In Annals of the ICRP: ICRP 2017 Proceedings. 3-4 ed. Vol. 47. SAGE Publications. 2018. p. 327-341. (Annals of the ICRP). https://doi.org/10.1177/0146645318756844

Author

Adam-Guillermin, Christelle ; Hertal-Aas, T. ; Oughton, Deborah ; Blanchard, L. ; Alonzo, Frédéric ; Armant, Olivier ; Horemans, Nele. / Radiosensitivity and transgenerational effects in non-human species. Annals of the ICRP: ICRP 2017 Proceedings. Vol. 47 3-4. ed. SAGE Publications, 2018. pp. 327-341 (Annals of the ICRP).

Bibtex - Download

@inproceedings{7cd84dc98e5c4d198870c6de0c855b15,
title = "Radiosensitivity and transgenerational effects in non-human species",
abstract = "The ALLIANCE working group on effects of ionising radiation on wildlife brings together European researchers to work on the topics of radiosensitivity and transgenerational effects in non-human biota. Differences in radiation sensitivity across species and phyla are poorly understood, but have important implications for understanding the overall effects of radiation and for radiation protection; for example, sensitive species may require special attention in monitoring and radiation protection, and differences in sensitivity between species also lead to overall effects at higher levels (community, ecosystem), since interactions between species can be altered. Hence, understanding the mechanisms of interspecies radiation sensitivity differences may help to clarify mechanisms underpinning intraspecies variation. Differences in sensitivity may only be revealed when organisms are exposed to ionising radiation over several generations. This issue of potential long-term or hereditary effects for both humans and wildlife exposed to low doses of ionising radiation is a major concern. Animal and plant studies suggest that gamma irradiation can lead to observable effects in the F1 generation that are not attributable to inheritance of a rare stable DNA mutation. Several studies have provided evidence of an increase in genomic instability detected in germ or somatic cells of F1 organisms from exposed F0 organisms. This can lead to induced radiosensitivity, and can result in phenotypic effects or lead to reproductive effects and teratogenesis. In particular, studies have been conducted to understand the possible role of epigenetic modifications, such as DNA methylation, histone modifications, or expression of non-coding RNAs in radiosensitivity, as well as in adaptation effects. As such, research using biological models in which the relative contribution of genetic and epigenetic processes can be elucidated is highly valuable.",
keywords = "ionizing radiation, wildlife, transgenerational effect, radiosensitivity, DNA methylation",
author = "Christelle Adam-Guillermin and T. Hertal-Aas and Deborah Oughton and L. Blanchard and Fr{\'e}d{\'e}ric Alonzo and Olivier Armant and Nele Horemans",
note = "Score=3",
year = "2018",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0146645318756844",
language = "English",
volume = "47",
series = "Annals of the ICRP",
publisher = "SAGE Publications",
pages = "327--341",
booktitle = "Annals of the ICRP",
edition = "3-4",

}

RIS - Download

TY - GEN

T1 - Radiosensitivity and transgenerational effects in non-human species

AU - Adam-Guillermin, Christelle

AU - Hertal-Aas, T.

AU - Oughton, Deborah

AU - Blanchard, L.

AU - Alonzo, Frédéric

AU - Armant, Olivier

AU - Horemans, Nele

N1 - Score=3

PY - 2018/10/1

Y1 - 2018/10/1

N2 - The ALLIANCE working group on effects of ionising radiation on wildlife brings together European researchers to work on the topics of radiosensitivity and transgenerational effects in non-human biota. Differences in radiation sensitivity across species and phyla are poorly understood, but have important implications for understanding the overall effects of radiation and for radiation protection; for example, sensitive species may require special attention in monitoring and radiation protection, and differences in sensitivity between species also lead to overall effects at higher levels (community, ecosystem), since interactions between species can be altered. Hence, understanding the mechanisms of interspecies radiation sensitivity differences may help to clarify mechanisms underpinning intraspecies variation. Differences in sensitivity may only be revealed when organisms are exposed to ionising radiation over several generations. This issue of potential long-term or hereditary effects for both humans and wildlife exposed to low doses of ionising radiation is a major concern. Animal and plant studies suggest that gamma irradiation can lead to observable effects in the F1 generation that are not attributable to inheritance of a rare stable DNA mutation. Several studies have provided evidence of an increase in genomic instability detected in germ or somatic cells of F1 organisms from exposed F0 organisms. This can lead to induced radiosensitivity, and can result in phenotypic effects or lead to reproductive effects and teratogenesis. In particular, studies have been conducted to understand the possible role of epigenetic modifications, such as DNA methylation, histone modifications, or expression of non-coding RNAs in radiosensitivity, as well as in adaptation effects. As such, research using biological models in which the relative contribution of genetic and epigenetic processes can be elucidated is highly valuable.

AB - The ALLIANCE working group on effects of ionising radiation on wildlife brings together European researchers to work on the topics of radiosensitivity and transgenerational effects in non-human biota. Differences in radiation sensitivity across species and phyla are poorly understood, but have important implications for understanding the overall effects of radiation and for radiation protection; for example, sensitive species may require special attention in monitoring and radiation protection, and differences in sensitivity between species also lead to overall effects at higher levels (community, ecosystem), since interactions between species can be altered. Hence, understanding the mechanisms of interspecies radiation sensitivity differences may help to clarify mechanisms underpinning intraspecies variation. Differences in sensitivity may only be revealed when organisms are exposed to ionising radiation over several generations. This issue of potential long-term or hereditary effects for both humans and wildlife exposed to low doses of ionising radiation is a major concern. Animal and plant studies suggest that gamma irradiation can lead to observable effects in the F1 generation that are not attributable to inheritance of a rare stable DNA mutation. Several studies have provided evidence of an increase in genomic instability detected in germ or somatic cells of F1 organisms from exposed F0 organisms. This can lead to induced radiosensitivity, and can result in phenotypic effects or lead to reproductive effects and teratogenesis. In particular, studies have been conducted to understand the possible role of epigenetic modifications, such as DNA methylation, histone modifications, or expression of non-coding RNAs in radiosensitivity, as well as in adaptation effects. As such, research using biological models in which the relative contribution of genetic and epigenetic processes can be elucidated is highly valuable.

KW - ionizing radiation

KW - wildlife

KW - transgenerational effect

KW - radiosensitivity

KW - DNA methylation

UR - http://ecm.sckcen.be/OTCS/llisapi.dll/open/31331928

U2 - 10.1177/0146645318756844

DO - 10.1177/0146645318756844

M3 - In-proceedings paper

VL - 47

T3 - Annals of the ICRP

SP - 327

EP - 341

BT - Annals of the ICRP

PB - SAGE Publications

ER -

ID: 4632744